According to a report from City Lab, women are 73% more likely to die or be seriously injured in a car crash than men are. Pennsylvania residents should know that there are probably several factors for this. With regard to this trend, auto safety experts as far back as 2011 said that seatbelts may be partially to blame.

In a USA Today article from that year, experts said that the majority of women injured in car crashes were relatively short and had seating postures that prevented them from getting the maximum protection offered by seatbelts. Now, a study from the University of Virginia is saying that seatbelts are not the only problem: Crash test dummies are not being designed with women in mind.

While there is a female crash dummy that was built back in 2003, it is only five feet tall and weighs 110 pounds. This is slightly outside of the dimensions of the average woman. Besides, the majority of crash dummies used in safety tests are the male types.

Researchers must take into account, then, the various physiological differences between men and women and apply them to real-life safety measures. These include differences in fat distribution, muscle strength and the shape of the pelvis.

Those who are injured in car accidents and who believe they have a right to compensation may want to consult with an attorney. Though women may incur more severe injuries, they will likely be filing their claim against the other driver’s auto insurance company rather than against the automakers. It all depends on how the other party was negligent.

With a lawyer, victims might gather the necessary proof, including the police report, eyewitness testimony and evidence found at the crash site. They may then have their lawyer negotiate for a reasonable settlement.