More than 10,000 people die in drunk driving accidents every year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. That’s almost 30 fatalities per day throughout Pennsylvania and the rest of the U.S. Furthermore, those numbers are just for drunk driving and do not include the number of deaths due to distracted driving. Volvo plans to reduce both categories by installing in-vehicle cameras and sensors that will observe driver behavior.

The Volvo systems will be looking for signs of intoxication or distraction. When such behavior is detected, the system will issue a warning. If the warning is ignored, the system will institute one or more measures designed to counteract the actions of the driver. Such measures range from limiting the vehicle’s speed to parking it in a safe place.

Some of the detectable features include a prolonged lack of steering, weaving across lanes and slow reaction times. In addition to the cameras and sensors, Volvo will limit the speed of its vehicles to 112 miles per hour beginning in 2020. Volvo says its aim is to prevent accidents rather than reduce the impact of inevitable collisions.

Drunk driving accidents can be very traumatic. Victims often experience pain and distress, and medical bills can pile up quickly. Additionally, an injured person may experience a loss of income if they are unable to work. In some cases, a crash victim can receive compensation for their injuries by filing a personal injury lawsuit. However, the legal system is quite difficult to navigate, and many victims could benefit from obtaining legal representation.